NEOVENATOR
5 days ago
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We presented two main findings, the first derived from spatial and temporal maps of data obtained from the different sources already mentioned. The maps showed that, while killing took place in different parts of the country, it did so at different rates and magnitudes — begging for an explanation we did not yet have. The second finding came out of a comparison of official census data from 1991 to the violence data we had collected. According to the census, there were approximately 600,000 Tutsi in the country in 1991; according to the survival organization Ibuka, about 300,000 survived the 1994 slaughter. This suggested that out of the 800,000 to 1 million believed to have been killed then, more than half were Hutu. The finding was significant; it suggested that the majority of the victims of 1994 were of the same ethnicity as the government in power. It also suggested that genocide — that is, a government’s attempts to exterminate an ethnic group — was hardly the only motive for some, and perhaps most, of the killing that occurred in the 100 days of 1994. »What Really Happened in Rwanda?
http://www.psmag.com/navigation/politics-and-law/what-really-happened-in-rwanda-3432/
via Instapaper
2 weeks ago
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…all development is deeply political. By taking over the financing of most public services, donors take pressure off the Congolese government to respond to the needs of its citizens. Ultimately, the rule of law will be created not through a capacity-building project in the ministry of finance but through a power struggle between the government, local elites, and business circles. Donors need to figure out how to most responsibly insert themselves in this dynamic and not just pave roads, build hospitals, and reform fiscal systems. »Jason Stearns. “Dancing in the Glory of Monsters.” 
3 weeks ago
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1. We do not want war
2. The opposite party alone is guilty of war
3. The enemy is the face of the devil.
4. We defend a noble cause, not our own interest
5. The enemy systematically commits cruelties; our mishaps are involuntary
6. The enemy uses forbidden weapons
7. We suffer small losses, those of the enemy are enormous
8. Artists and intellectuals back our cause
9. Our cause is sacred
10. All who doubt our propaganda, are traitors
»Truth is the first casualty when war is declared | 972 Magazine
1 month ago
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Here ethics offer a solution. An ethical life is one in which we identify ourselves with other, larger, goals, thereby giving meaning to our lives. The view that there is harmony between ethics and enlightened self-interest is an ancient one, now often scorned. Cynicism is more fashionable than idealism. But such hopes are not groundless, and there are substantial elements of truth in the ancient view that an ethically reflective life is also a good life for the person leading it. Never has it been so urgent that the reasons for accepting this view should be widely understood. »The Drowning Child and the Expanding Circle, by Peter Singer
1 month ago
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Having first excitedly and, over the last few years, numbly sat through many of these keynotes, I no longer see the appeal. An expensive but less feature-rich facsimile of a device I already have? Another screen to charge, manage, update, and respond to as it pushes notifications at me? It doesn’t quite seem enough that I can send sketches or tweets from my wrist. Nor does it seem empowering that, owing to the device’s small surface area, it encourages you to use canned messages to respond to friend’s chats. »Apple’s Watch Is Like a Personalized Mood Ring | New Republic
1 month ago
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We labeled this pattern of responses “naïve dualism.” This is the belief that acts are brought about either by intentions or by the physical laws that govern our brains and that those two types of causes — psychological and biological — are categorically distinct. People are responsible for actions resulting from one but not the other. (In citing neuroscience, the Supreme Court may have been guilty of naïve dualism: did it really need brain evidence to conclude that adolescents are immature?) Naïve dualism is misguided. “Was the cause psychological or biological?” is the wrong question when assigning responsibility for an action. All psychological states are also biological ones. »Neuroscience and Moral Responsibility - NYTimes.com
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As it turns out, reproductive strategies – most behavioral strategies, in fact – are widely variable, and you see a pretty stable constellation of them in any given population. Rather than try to promote the idea that one particular strategy is the only one any successful person would think of using, we should be identifying, appreciating, and understanding this variation. »5 Ways to Make Progress in Evolutionary Psychology: Smash, Not Match, Stereotypes | Context and Variation, Scientific American Blog Network
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