NEOVENATOR
3 hours ago
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Amazon much resembles a political party that hasn’t figured out how to recalibrate its rhetoric to appeal to voters outside its base. Its pronouncements come in Amazonspeak, a language bred in a corporate echo chamber and the cheerleading threads of its self-publisher forums. Hence, its incessant harping on the fact that Hachette is owned by the “$10 billion global conglomerate” the Lagardère Group — itself dwarfed by Amazon’s own $90-billion valuation. (As Preston pointed out in the Times, conglomerates jettison or downsize insufficiently profitable divisions all the time, so to pretend that Lagardère will blithely absorb Hachette’s losses is absurd.) »Amazon’s awful war of words: How an iron-fisted PR strategy went off the rails
2 weeks ago
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Veganism and, to a slightly lesser extent, vegetarianism both follow this pattern, as modern secular parallels of Jainism. Their response to the terror of mortality is to attempt to create a zone of non-death, a zone from which the Reaper has been entirely banished, visiting neither flies, nor rats, nor us. In Jainism, the death-denial element is explicit: your ultimate reward for keeping your hands unbloodied is to become godlike. In veganism, it is only implicit, but nonetheless the religious or ritualistic elements are present: such as in the actions of a friend of mine who, when deciding to become vegan, threw out the half-finished pack of butter in her fridge. What animals were helped by this act, what suffering allayed? None, of course. But it at least banished death from her toast. »How much should we worry about death? – Stephen Cave – Aeon
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Known, high-risk mutations can now be identified in >10% of cases of SZ, 25-30% of cases of ASD, and over 60% of cases of severe intellectual disability. Those numbers represent a vast increase from even a few years ago and are sure to increase rapidly in the very near future. Even if the genetic effects in many cases are more complicated (involving more than one mutation at a time, with contributions from common variants), the major message remains the same: these conditions are incredibly genetically heterogeneous. It is probably far more appropriate to think of “autistic symptoms” or “schizophrenic symptoms” as a common consequence of many distinct genetic conditions, than to think of “autism” or “schizophrenia” as monolithic disorders. »Wiring the Brain: “Common disorders” are really collections of rare genetic conditions
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Beautful

(Source: vimeo.com)

3 weeks ago
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An act is wrong just when such acts are disallowed by some principle that is optimific, uniquely universally willable, and not reasonably rejectable. »How to Be Good - The New Yorker
3 weeks ago
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This Cinderella status contributes to the fact that evidence-based psychological treatments, such as CBT, IPT, behaviour therapy and family therapy, have not yet fully benefitted from the range of dramatic advances in the neuroscience related to emotion, behaviour and cognition. Meanwhile, much of neuroscience is unaware of the potential of psychological treatments. »Psychological treatments: A call for mental-health science : Nature News & Comment
1 month ago
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